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JPS 2018 Bond Questions & Answers

June 29, 2018

  1. How did the District come to the amount of $65 million for the Bond?
  2. Explain the fee structure associated with the Bond.
  3. How are the projects chosen?
  4. Why should the citizens support a bond for JPS when it is an F rated District?
  5. What will the election cost the City of Jackson and how will it be paid?
  6. Were all projects from the 2006 bond completed? If not, explain why?
  7. Why was Mosely Mullen Elementary School never constructed?
  8. What would happen to JPS if the Bond does not pass on August 7?
  9. If the Bond passes on August 7, when will projects begin?
  10. Why did JPS close or consolidate schools prior to the upcoming bond election when the $65 million could have gone toward repairing those schools?
  11. Why should citizens support a bond without a permanent superintendent in JPS?

Q1. How did the District come to the amount of $65 million for the Bond?

The District determined the amount based on the needs of the schools.

Q2. Explain the fee structure associated with the Bond.

The fees were budgeted at  the highest amount allowed in order to plan for the total amount of the transaction. Actual costs will be less than the budgeted amount.

Q3. How are the projects chosen?

The projects were chosen in order of priority to first address the items noted in the MDE audit and then those projects that will have direct impact on instruction.

Q4. Why should the citizens support a bond for JPS when it is an F rated District?

The repairs for schools are required regardless of the rating of the District. The MDE requirements to provide safe schools is not dependent on the outcome of state tests. Students in JPS deserve quality and modern facilities without any consideration of performance on tests. 

Q5. What will the election cost the City of Jackson and how will it be paid?

We are working with the City of Jackson to determine the actual costs of the election and right now do not have any actual amounts.  However the District will reimburse the City of Jackson for those costs by September 30.

Q6. Were all projects from the 2006 bond completed? If not, explain why?

There were over $300 million in projects that were listed in the plans for the 2006 bond issue. As required by state law, the District must bid and/or receive quotes on projects and costs for some projects exceeding the amount that was initially anticipated. The District determined the priority projects at that time and completed as many of those as funds would allow. The district will continue to follow the law and address its priority projects when funds are received from this bond issue. 

Q7. Why was Mosely Mullen Elementary School never constructed?

Mosley Mullen Elementary school was never proposed in the initial bond referendum. Funds were allocated to do work at Barr Elementary. The administration determined that those renovations would not be sufficient.  In 2009 the JPS Board of Trustees authorized the issuance of additional bonds (Qualified School Construction Bonds) to support the building of a new school. However, after numerous bids, the cost of the school exceeded the amount that was available to build the school. The funds for the school were returned, and the remaining funds were allocated to other projects.

Q8. What would happen to JPS if the Bond does not pass on August 7?

The school district will not be able to make the needed repairs and renovations.

Q9. If the Bond passes on August 7, when will projects begin?

Projects will be bid out as soon as possible and once the funds are received in the District (anticipated by December 2018), they will begin as soon as they can feasibly be done without interruption of schools.

Q10. Why did JPS close or consolidate schools prior to the upcoming bond election when the $65 million could have gone toward repairing those schools?

The District made and will continue to make responsible decisions when it comes to the number of schools that it can support. The District has experienced a continuous decline in enrollment which will have to be addressed with the number of schools it maintains. Growth in the city will continue to be monitored so that the District will be able to meet the needs of students and their families, which may also guide future decisions of school locations.

Q11. Why should citizens support a bond without a permanent superintendent in JPS?

The repairs for schools are required regardless of who is superintendent of the District. Students in JPS deserve quality and modern facilities without any consideration of who is in leadership. 

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